How to watch the SUPER BLOOD MOON eclipse: Rare phenomenon will be seen throughout most of the world this weekend


posted
Categories: Education
  • Supermoon lunar eclipse will take place on September 27th and 28th
  • It will be visible in North and South America, Africa and western Asia
  • The event will also be seen in eastern Pacific Ocean region and Europe
  •  It will last 1 hour and 11 minutes and begins at 8:11pm ET (1.11am BST)
  • It is last in a tetrad of blood moons, which some say signals doomsday

Get ready for a rare double feature this weekend, starring our very own moon.

For the first time in more than 30 years, you can witness a red supermoon in combination with a lunar eclipse.

Late on Sunday 26th of September, across much of the world, a total lunar eclipse will mask the moon's larger-than-life face.

That combination hasn't been seen since 1982 and won't happen again until 2033.

Scroll down for video 

Get ready for a double feature this weekend, starring our own moon. For the first time in more than 30 years, you can witness a red supermoon (pictured here over Washington in July) in combination with a lunar eclipse

Some believe the eclipse has larger significance.

The last 'blood moon' occurred over Easter and the 'supermoon' lunar eclipse will form the fourth event in a 'Tetrad,' which is believed to mark the the beginning of significant events - even the the end of the world - in some religions. 

The next Tetrad cycle won't occur until 2032.

Some Christians are concerned that the celestial event could mark the start of terrible events, based on a passage from the Bible that says: 'The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and the terrible day of the Lord comes.' 

John Hagee, a Christian pastor who has written a book on the Tetrad called 'Four Blood Moons: Something is About to Change' told the Daily Express that the April blood moon marked the dawn of a 'hugely significant event' for the world.

'This is not something that some religious think tank has put together,' the notoriously outspoken church founder said. 


'It will be quite exciting and especially dramatic,' predicted astronomer Sam Lindsay of the Royal Astronomical Society in London.

'It'll be brighter than usual, bigger than usual.' 

Some people event believe it may never happen, with this weekend's events, they say, signalling the end of the world. 

The last 'blood moon' occurred over Easter and the 'supermoon' lunar eclipse will form the fourth event in a 'Tetrad,' which is believed to mark the the beginning of significant events - even the the end of the world - in some religions.

When a full or new moon makes its closest approach to Earth, it's called a supermoon. Although still 222,000 miles away, this full moon will look bigger and brighter than usual.

This will be combined with a lunar eclipse, when the full moon passes through the darkest part of Earth's shadow, the umbra.

Sunday's supermoon eclipse will last 1 hour and 11 minutes, and will be visible to North and South America, Europe, Africa, and parts of West Asia and the eastern Pacific.

Weather permitting, you can see the supermoon after nightfall, and the eclipse will cast it into shadow beginning at 8:11pm ET (1.11am BST).

The eclipse will begin at 9:07 pm ET (2.07 am BST) on Sunday night, or Monday morning in the UK.

According to Phil Plait's blog, Bad Astronomy, this is the time you'll start to see a dark 'bite' taken out of them moon on the part of it nearest the horizon.

The moon will then spend just over an hour passing into the shadows, with the last sighting of it at 10:11 ET (3:11 BST).

It will be illuminated once again at 11:23 ET (4.23 BST), and it will be completely out of Earth's shadow at 00:27 ET (5:27 am BST).

Nasa is also providing a live stream from 8pm ET until at least 11:30 pm ET (4.30 am BST), broadcast from Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The live feed is an alternative for those experiencing less-than-optimal weather or light-polluted night skies.

 

Depending on weather conditions on September 27, lucky viewers will see a full moon that looks larger and brighter than usual, with a red tinge. This image shows the last blood moon, which occurred on April 3

U1 is when the moon begins to enter the dark part of the shadow, also known as the umbra. Everyone west of the line 'U4' will miss the event 

  Page Turn