Edible Rings On Six-Packs Feed Marine Life If They End Up In The Ocean


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"Most of these plastic six-pack rings end up in our oceans and pose a serious threat to wildlife. Together with Saltwater Brewery, a small craft beer brand in Florida whose primary target are surfers fishermen and people who love the sea, we decided to tackle the issue head on and make a statement for the whole beer industry to follow. We ideated, designed, prototyped and manufactured Edible Six Pack Rings. A six-pack packaging design that instead of killing animals, feeds them."

photo COURTESY OF WE BELIEVERS

This has become a common sight among sea life everywhere.  More common is the amount of plastic that is ingested.  It is believed that a million sea birds ingest plastic and either grow ill or die!  What if this one simple design could lead the way to most disposable plastics becoming edible or biodegradeable, so that the critters are not harmed by our waste, but instead, can feed off it?   

photo COURTESY OF WE BELIEVERS

This is just a starting point, and with a little bit of publicity, change is on the way!  When it hits the shelves, be smart consumers!  Buy product that uses edible rings so that we are doing our part to create demand for sustainable solutions!

photo COURTESY OF WE BELIEVERS

According to a report published in the journal PNAS, researchers have found that about 90 percent of seabirds have eaten plastic and are likely to retain some in their gut. They also are “virtually certain” that by 2050, any seabird found dead will have plastic in their stomach.


The Ocean Conservancy’s 2015 Ocean Trash Index — which enlisted 561,895 volunteers to pick up 16,186,759 pounds of garbage — also offers a few staggering facts. It cites plastic as among the most common trash item ingested by sea turtles in 2015. Volunteers found 57 marine mammals, 440 fish and 22 sharks, skates and sting rays entangled in plastic. The index also explains that littering isn’t the sole culprit for plastic in the ocean. Plastic can also be blown by the wind from a trashcan or dump, end up in a storm drain and then travel through pipes into the ocean.

"Facts like these makes a concept like edible six-pack rings seem vital." Says the Huffington Post

“We hope to influence the big guys,” Chris Goves, Saltwater Brewery’s president, said. “And hopefully inspire them to get on board,”

photo COURTESY OF WE BELIEVERS

 

 

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