Why you should eat turmeric


posted
Categories: Health & Nutrition

Over 5,000 medical studies have yielded over 600 potential health benefits of turmeric – an ancient spice that has been used for 6,000 years in Ayurvedic medicine.

The major benefits of turmeric are due its primary polyphenol known as curcumin which has been found to fight cancer stem cells, protect against radiation induced damage, reduce inflammation and prevent, or even help to reverse, Alzheimer’s disease.

There's more to turmeric than spicing up a curry. Research shows it has many benefits and may help ward off dementia and reduce your risk of cancer.

 

Botanical name: Curcuma longa

Belonging to the ginger family, turmeric has been used in East India and the Middle East for thousands of years, and is now one of the most highly-prized spices in the world. It's actually unclear whether it was first used for its peppery flavor and the unique kick it lends to foods. Ancient medicinal uses for turmeric began when it was noted as an anti-inflammatory agent, and then to treat a wide variety of conditions, such as jaundice, menstrual problems, blood in the urine, hemorrhaging, toothaches, bruises, chest pain, flatulence, and colic.

The name “turmeric” is derived from the Persian word for "saffron," the neon yellow-orange hue used to make curry and yellow mustard. A domesticated plant rather than wild, India remains one of the most prominent producers of turmeric, along with Indonesia, the Philippines, China, Taiwan, Jamaica, and Haiti.

If you're cooking a curry this evening, you might want to sprinkle in some extra turmeric. Research is showing what countries such as India and Sri Lanka have long known - that this yellow spice has more benefits than boosting food flavour. Used for more than 4000 years to treat a variety of ailments, curcumin - the active ingredient in turmeric - could potentially ward off dementia and prevent cancer.

According to the World Alzheimer's Report 2009, 3.6 per cent of South Asians over the age of 60 suffer from dementia, compared with 6.4 per cent of Australasians and 7.2 per cent of Western Europeans. Similarly, the World Health Organization says that cancer rates in India are considerably lower than those in more developed countries such as the US.

 

But is it turmeric that's having this effect? Cancer researcher Ralph W. Moss believes so. He says turmeric is a natural anti-inflammatory, it inhibits the growth of new blood vessels in tumours and it's a powerful antioxidant. But before you start gulping it by the spoonful, Aloysa Hourigan, Nutrition Australia senior nutritionist, says it's not that simple. "Curcumin is just one antioxidant, and it might have some function, but I don't think there's one super thing that's going to fix everything.

Also, a lot of the studies have been done on animals and test tubes, so from a western medicine point of view the evidence is not strong enough. But it's been used in Chinese and Indian medicine for a long time, so it may well have some benefit." While more testing is needed, here are seven potential health reasons to start sprinkling away.

1. Wards off Alzheimer's disease

Researchers believe that curcumin's antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties may be strong enough to break down the amyloid plaques in the brain that contribute to Alzheimer's disease. "If the blood vessels remain less clogged, then certain parts of the brain might be fed more easily with oxygen and that would keep the brain functioning better," explains Hourigan. The Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the University of California is currently planning clinical human trials.

2. Helps to prevent cancer

In his book, The 150 Healthiest Foods On Earth (Fair Winds), nutritionist Jonny Bowden says there are at least 30 studies showing that curcumin may have an anti-tumour effect, "either reducing the number or size of tumours or the percentage of animals who developed them".

While more human research is needed, he points to a 2006 study showing that curcumin inhibited the growth of human colon cancer. A New Jersey study found that, when combined with vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, it may help treat and prevent prostate cancer.

There are also indications that it may help to prevent breast, skin and pancreatic cancer, childhood leukaemia and multiple myeloma. "While no-one is claiming that turmeric cures cancer, there is plenty of reason to believe it is a useful adjunct to a healthy diet," says Bowden.

 

3. Reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes

Curcumin also has a positive effect on cholesterol, says Bowden, and animal studies have shown that it may help lower cholesterol and prevent the build-up of LDL ("bad" cholesterol) in the blood vessels. It could therefore stop the build-up of plaque (atherosclerosis) that can block arteries and cause heart attacks and strokes.

4. Combats inflammatory diseases

Turmeric's natural anti-inflammatory qualities mean it may work as well as some anti-inflammatory medications, without the side effects. Early research shows it may help with inflammation of the eye (uveitis), inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis) and multiple sclerosis.

One study, using a formula which contained turmeric, showed it reduced the pain and disability associated with osteoarthritis, but it hasn't been studied on its own yet.

5.Fights colds and flu

Preliminary studies show that turmeric may help reduce the severity ofbacterial and viral infections.

6. Helps indigestion and weight loss

Curcumin stimulates the gallbladder and produces bile. Because bile helps digest fat, experts believe this improves digestion and may help control weight. At least one study found it treats indigestion, reducing symptoms of bloating and gas.

7. Assists diabetes sufferers

Turmeric may improve glucose control or insulin activity; in animal research it was shown to cause blood sugar levels to drop. If you add turmeric to your diet, Hourigan suggests monitoring your blood sugars. When combined with diabetes medication, it may cause levels to drop too low, resulting in hypoglycaemia.

 

How do i take it?

Nutrition Australia says turmeric can easily be added to your diet. "We encourage people to use a range of herbs and spices as they're good sources of antioxidants, which may have protective effects for health," says Hourigan. Turmeric's roots and bulbs are generally boiled and dried to form powder. You can also grate it like ginger or take asupplement (powdered capsules, fluid extract or drops). Adults can take about one to three grams of the dried powdered root per day.

Many of the health benefits of turmeric can be experienced by thinking of your food as a medicine, which was the advice of Hippocrates in the 4th century B.C. This bright yellow spice, traditionally used as food and medicine, contains potent antioxidants and benefits that studies have shown can fight diabetes, cancer, and heart disease.

To get the most of what turmeric has to offer, use it to enhance many of the current ho-hum dishes on your table, such as fish dishes or any meat for that matter; turmeric can add delicious complexity to mashed dishes like potatoes or cauliflower, sautés with onions, broccoli, carrots, or bell peppers. It can be used as a base for creamy vegetable dips, sauces, and egg salad.

Be sure to choose the full, organic turmeric spice rather than a curry blend, which has a negligible amount of anything healthful.

via BodyAndSoul

  Page Turn  


Related articles in Health & Nutrition