Wet summer hits the honey harvest: Amount produced expected to be just a third of last year's crop


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Categories: Nature
  • Wet, windy and cooler weather came at key times of nectar production 
  • It meant bees collected significantly less to deposit in honeycomb cells
  • Unable to build up colonies which means many could die during winter
  • Harvest in Scotland is 'not just poor, it is disastrous', says bee expert


Bee farmer: Crispin Reeves, of Haughton Honey in Cheshire, said there 'definitely won’t be anywhere near as much English honey around this season'

The poor summer weather has left British bees struggling to produce honey, with this year’s harvest expected to be just a third of last year’s.

Wet, windy weather and cool temperatures at key times of nectar production meant bees collected significantly less to deposit in honeycomb cells, say farmers.

The bees have also been unable to build up their colonies, which means many could die during the winter.

Bee farmer Crispin Reeves, of Haughton Honey in Cheshire, said: ‘The honey crop can fluctuate quite widely from one year to the next and, in the main, it’s all down to the weather.

‘After talking to bee farmers across the country, it looks likely that the honey harvest generally could be around a third of last year’s crop.

‘We’re still processing, but there definitely won’t be anywhere near as much English honey around this season.’

Bees in the South East fared ‘slightly better’ than in the rest of the country, and in Scotland the harvest is ‘not just poor, it is disastrous’, said Bee Farmers’ Association general secretary Margaret Ginman.

She added: ‘There was under a third of the normal spring blossom honey crop and the long wet summer has meant colonies failed to build up for the heather honey.

Regional variations: Bees in the South East fared ‘slightly better’ than in the rest of the country, and in Scotland the harvest is ‘not just poor, it is disastrous!

 

Rain at Glastonbury in June: Wet, windy weather and cool temperatures at key times of nectar production meant bees collected significantly less to deposit in honeycomb cells, say farmers

‘The flowering of the heather itself was late and not as glorious as in some years. Here the crop is expected to be 50 per cent of normal.

via: dailymail.co.uk

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