At One Time It Was Legal To Mail Your Children


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In 1913 it was legal to mail children in the U.S.A. With stamps attached to their clothing, children rode trains to their destinations, accompanied by letter carriers. One newspaper reported it cost fifty-three cents for parents to mail their daughter to her grandparents for a family visit. As news stories and photos popped up around the country, it didn't take long to get a law on the books making it illegal to send children through the mail.

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Here at living off the grid, we understand that modernization has made life more comfortable and enjoyable than ever in history.  We also realize that much of that contribution was made on the backs of our ancestors who worked and toiled to see that we had a better life.  This is the first generation in history who has instantaneous access to the history, the knowledge, and photographs from people all over the world.  We have managed to explore, span, and connect the world in a way that's totally amazing.  Now that we have discovered technologies that will allow us to clean up many of the messes we have made, and to be more efficient, we are here to turn your head and point your eyes to the problems, and also to great solutions that others share and do... in hopes that the great ideas will be elevated, and that bad ones will find their way out. 

No matter the intentions, some ideas are bad, as the one above.  But bad ideas can be modified to be good ones.  Some ideas just need to be thrown out, and the premise started over.

I believe we have built homes in the U.S.A that are extremely inefficient for energy usage as a product of the credit "get it now" craze that ravaged Americans into indebtedness.  Today we re-evaluate what we have built, how we have set up towns and codes, and how better to proceed.  Much of what we know should be thrown out for more efficient sustainable solutions.  Lets all explore and continue down this path together and see where it leads.

Dave Webster

Facebook's: Living off the Grid

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