How To Build A Wooden Wind Turbine From Scratch!


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Categories: Energy

 

Figure 5: View of our workshop in Nea Makri, while we were busy working on the blades

Figure 6-7: Kostas, our instructor, showing us how to check if the surface of the blade is truly plane using a square and giving the final polish to the three blades

Figure 6-7: Kostas, our instructor, showing us how to check if the surface of the blade is truly plane using a square and giving the final polish to the three blades

Further chiseling is also required to create a twisted shape of the blade along its length. This is necessary for capturing more force of the wind along the blade the width of which changes along its length.

Figure 8-9: Paul chiselling near to the root of the blade (the thickest part, where all blades will finally be connected to from the rotor). The final product of the first day of work. The transformation of the blank is not finished, but slowly resembles a blade


Figure 8-9: Paul chiselling near to the root of the blade (the thickest part, where all blades will finally be connected to from the rotor). The final product of the first day of work. The transformation of the blank is not finished, but slowly resembles a blade

We finished about half of the work needed to complete the blades on the first day.

The second day:

On the second day we continued working on the blades, and cut the pieces that sandwich the blades in the end. Further, we also started to build the device for winding the coils and started to wind them.

Figure 10-11: Some more cutting and subsequent chiselling of the blocks, while Michael using “heavy” machinery to give some shape to the blade

Figure 10-11: Some more cutting and subsequent chiselling of the blocks, while Michael using “heavy” machinery to give some shape to the blade

After two days of wood working the blades where finished and now really have the shape they should have, including the airfoil-like shape along the width of the blade.

Figure 12: The final blade, now they only needed to be assembled to form the rotor.

Figure 12: The final blade, now they only needed to be assembled to form the rotor.

For the pieces that sandwich the blades, a triangular and a circular piece of plywood have been cut with a jigsaw. Afterwards all the pieces needed some filing in order to bring them into shape and to reduce the risk of chippings.

Figure 13: Me filing the circular sandwiching piece


Figure 13: Me filing the circular sandwiching piece

In order to wind the coils into a specific form a template had to be created and assembled onto a block of wood. The block of wood was then fixed to the vice and by threaded crank shaft, the template could be turned and thus wind the coil into the appropriate form.

The coils moreover have to have a certain amount of windings, so that the right amount of voltage is induced by the changing magnetic field of the magnets.